What the…

“What the hell is Neumannic Times?”

A blog for teachers, teaching, and anyone who gives a shiitake about education. Hi there. My name’s Ryan. Most people call me Neumann.

Monday through Friday, I willingly identify with the following stereotypes:

    • Teacher
    • Writer
    • Runner

Saturday through Sunday, there’s really no telling.

Here’s my deal:

I created Neumannic Times in 2009 as the absurdities of my teaching life became harder and harder to comprehend. Unable to process why teaching was making me even more socially inept than normal, I turned to writing as a way to reflect and digest the career that was consuming my life.

In 2011, I rifled through the ramblings of my rookie years, organized them in a choose-your-own-adventure sort of way, and pressed the “publish” button within Amazon’s self-publishing service, CreateSpace. Within days, my first book, titled What Had Happened: a work of friction appeared in the Amazon bookstore.

In 2013, What Had Happened: a work of friction was awarded the National Council of Teachers of English’s James N. Britton Award for the questions it raised about teaching and learning.

Fast forward to now.

I’ve spent the past six-ish years using this blog to reflect and share my thoughts, feelings, and reactions to life as a teacher. These days you’ll notice 3 major categories (top of this screen, below the banner) within Neumannic Times:

      • #Awkwords = awkword things my students say (purposely misspelled and devoted to the awkward things my students say)
      • Neu Times = mildly ridiculous teachery stories that further document my arrested development (written after What Had Happened was published)
      • The Art of Teaching = candid interviews with teachers young and old, jaded and idealistic, delving into the art of what they do, where they find inspiration, and the perspective that informs their inclination to look beyond what is and envision what could be, and why they’ve decided to stay (or leave) the teaching profession

Since I began my teaching career, the expectations I’ve had for myself have been simple:

      1. Work as hard as possible to make the classes I teach as awesome and engaging as possible.
      2. Do whatever I can to help my students be as successful as possible.
      3. Treat people the way I would like to be treated (nicely, with respect, and as equals).
      4. Positively affect, and effect, change into the world of education.

This blog is an extension of my fourth expectation, and I’d be more than stoked if you’d be willing to checkout what I’ve wrote!

Contact Information:

Why, Hello There!

No comments yet... Be the first to leave a reply!

Leave a Reply